John Gordon: Mission (Catalyst Notes)

John Gordon is an American author and speaker on the topics of leadership, culture, sales, and teamwork. His focus was mission. He said that mission starts with leadership. He gave us 7 C’s that can help leaders in ministries to be successful and effective.

  1. Culture. Many companies have a mission, but how many of their people are ON mission? How many places operate as one team, with one plan and goal? Once you know what you stand for it becomes much easier for everyone to make decisions.
  2. Contagious. Leadership is a transfer of belief. Positive leaders, regardless of circumstances or outcomes, point everyone towards the future. Be aware: one person can’t make a team, but one person can break it (example: energy vampires). If someone is complaining, they should also be bringing a solution to the table. If you are complaining, you aren’t leading.
  3. Communicate. If you are too busy to communicate with your team, you can’t lead. Communication is key.
  4. Connections. Connections build commitment. A team will always beat talent when talent isn’t acting like a team. Be sure to share defining moments in your life.
  5. Commitment. He told this story of a man complaining about giving his wife a shoulder massage after she’d had a tough day. His friend told him, ‘If you don’t give her a massage, someone else will.’ It’s the same with our team. Most of the time, we don’t need a different team, we need to be better leaders. He said that he realized he didn’t want to be a big household name, he wanted to be big in his household.
  6. Care. Great leaders care more. This includes both love and accountability, the two things that help build a great team. Accountability is an act of caring because it doesn’t let others settle or demotivate the team.
  7. Consistent. Nothing happens if we aren’t consistent. Share your telescope with the team, let them see the North Star. Also share your microscope with them when you see critical activities being done well. It all starts on the inside, in the locker room.
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Dave Ramsey: Building Unity (Notes from Catalyst)

Dave Ramsey is an American entrepreneur whose work brings financial freedom to people in all walks of life. He began his talk by speaking about the Belgian Plow Horse.

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You see, this amazing horse can pull 8,000 lbs. on it’s own. But if you take two of them, who have never met before and team them up, they can pull 24,000 lbs. together. Somehow, through their teamwork, their immediately able to do the work that most people would have assumed would require three horses. The really amazing thing is, when those two horses are a matched pair, they are fairly similarly, know each other, etc. they’re able to pull 32,000 lbs. That’s 4x the work that one can do!

Now the whole world had one language and a common speech. As people moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there. They said to each other, “Come, let’s make bricks and bake them thoroughly.” They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves; otherwise we will be scattered over the face of the whole earth.” But the Lord came down to see the city and the tower the people were building. The Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.” So the Lord scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. That is why it was called Babel—because there the Lord confused the language of the whole world. From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth. (Genesis 11:1-9)

The remarkable thing about this verse is that the Lord said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them.” God says that nothing is impossible for us when we act in uncommon fellowship. In this story, we see that the people who settled in Shinar started worshipping what God gave us (like the ability to build a tower that reaches to the heavens) rather than worship the God who made all things possible for us.

Unity and uncommon fellowship is not a natural occurrence, it is from intentionality. Dave Ramsey outlined 5 enemies of this over his time as an organizational and spiritual leader.

  1. Poor Communication
    1. Learned from Andy Stanley, repetition is key as leader. Tell them until they are annoyed with you telling them, because then you know they know. Then, remind them.
    2. Cast vision, and spend a tremendous amount of time and energy as a leader communicating that vision.
      1. Sit down together, invest in breaking bread with each other (you wouldn’t believe, he said, they amount they spend on people eating together)
      2. Organizations move at the speed of the trust we’ve built
  2. Gossip
    1. Why do people who pee in their cereal gripe about the taste?
    2. Psalm 34:14 “Keep your tongue from evil And your lips from speaking deceit.”
    3. Real complaints have a responsibility to be taken to leadership, but you also have a responsibility to be part of the solution.
  3. Unresolved Disagreement
    1. Leaders pull, bosses push
      1. We don’t push people to where we want to be, we go and pull them to where we are
      2. You might not like each other, but you need to trust each other
      3. Disagreements distract us from the goal
  4. Lack of Shared Purpose
    1. When we drop the ball, anyone on the team can pick up the ball because we all know where we go.
      1. Most of the time, if we have 12 people, we have 12 agendas which creates tension and confused priorities.
  5. Sanctioned Incompetence
    1. If you allow incompetence or non-compliance, you demotivate your whole team.
      1. Whether they are volunteers or employees, excellence is the standard. By not dealing with those who don’t meet the standard, you are encouraging it. Misbehavior then gets worse and hurts everyone.
      2. To be unclear is to be unkind.
        1. Example: A old guy who was being too much of a hugger and was creeping everyone out. As soon as it was brought to his attention, he confronted the issue. “Stop doing that, you’re being a creeper.” “It’s how I am.” His response? “Change.” Why? Because behavior, like being a creeper, is a decision and it’s not okay.

These are spiritual issues. If you adopt these as guides for leadership and enforce them, then your team will adopt it and remind you of it when the team fails to meet those expectations.

Moral Leadership

In Lives of Moral Leadership we are told early on that, “…having the courage to speak up despite others’ moods or discouragement,” is a hallmark of a good leader. (Cole, p. 7) But this is a tool, not the tool. A megaphone does not a leader make. So how are we to be, use, and create moral leaders?

Robert Kennedy was discussed substantially in this book and I am surprised and thankful for it. He walks us through Kennedy’s decision to go after child malnutrition. Kennedy leads a group of doctors through the maze of political tape in an effort to try to successfully feed hungry children. Less than 12 months before his death, he tells one of the doctor’s,

There will be problems from the same quarters, but we’re moving along – and it’s hard to be in favor of hunger in children, even if you think of yourself as representing well-fed grown-ups. (Cole, 2001, 36)

Robert Kennedy spent time investing and enabling these doctors to understand both the political reality they operated in while simultaneously training them to maintain their moral leadership; a fine balance. He emphasized how important perception was in politics and would listen to things from his perspective, the opposition, the “common man,” etc.

For the moral doctors, the value lay in the medical observations. Kennedy was trying to teach them to be more effective. “Moreover, he was concerned about how we presented our work – not only its matter, but our manner.” (Cole, 18) As good as it might feel to be a moralist who gets his say what value does it have if it achieves nothing? To this point, an effective moral leader understands the means by which to communicate. It is important to continue action while displaying some passion and a driving momentum. Always consider what you are compromising, and consider what will be lost if you do not.

Another quote from Kennedy I found very insightful was, “You’re stepping on toes – people will move, and they’ll move to protect themselves.” (Cole, 31) True in many ways, you have to be watchful morally as well always trying to meet the standard you ask of others and when you fail, be transparent. Nothing good comes from being hidden.

Lastly, be realistic with yourself and others. Do the pep talks, build into people, be vulnerable. But Kennedy tells one of the doctors:

“I want you to know,” he repeated, “that I’ll give it all I’ve got…I’ll tell you now , it’ll seem easy at first – there’ll be a lot of attention and interest. But it’ll get hard, really hard – we’ll have to fight here (in the Congress) and elsewhere… Well, I expect we’ll get through this struggle, and I expect if we do, some children will eat better than before.” (Cole, 33)

So this road to changing the nation is going to be long and hard but there is fruit at the end. We don’t know what the bounty of the fruit will be. But we have to have faith that if we act as we must in accordance with our character the fruit will reflect the plant off of which it comes.